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Penn State: It’s all about football

13 Nov
Penn State and Joe Paterno

Photo Courtesy of The Sports Net

This is a guest post from my good friend Jason Smith who is a husband, father and advocate of freedom and truth. He resides in Hurricane, Utah. This was meant as an opinion piece for St. George News, which is currently being updated and will be posted on that site soon, as well.

Yesterday, Penn State played a game without Joe Paterno on the sidelines for the first time in over 40 years; and lost.

Players from both teams knelt in prayer before the game.  Over 107,903 fans (the largest of the year) packed the stadium and cheered for Penn State University, the football team, and for Joe Paterno’s legacy.

But what about the victims?

Somewhere there are at least eight boys (young men now) who lost their innocence, and in some ways their lives, amid the roar of those 107,903 fans, Penn State University, and the legacy of Joe Paterno.

There should never have been a game.

The football field should have had eight white roses on the 50-yard line in a completely empty stadium.

We saw players and fans talking about Joe Paterno, many wearing shirts in support of “JoePa”. We saw teary-eyed coaches speak of the man and his legacy.

But who will speak for the victims?

All I can think about is eight boys who will never watch a Penn State football game – because they can’t and they won’t. All I can think about is a living-hell locker room that at least two boys lived through and will never forget.

Penn State’s new president said the following: “We wanted to demonstrate, not just in the Penn State community but to rest of world, that Penn State is a caring community”  – Translation: “We wanted to demonstrate to the rest of the world, that Penn State is all about football- that’s why we played today” 

Yesterday Penn State played a football game after at least three key members of the coaching staff, and a minimum of three high-level administrators covered up child rapes.

Yesterday Penn State showed the world what is important to Penn State – a winning football team.

Ironically, having a winning football team at all costs is why eight boys will struggle with depression, anger, hatred and dysfunction for their entire lives.

Yesterday Penn State played a football game while eight young men are struggling to understand why football and the power that comes with it are more important than their innocence and lives.

Yesterday Penn State continued the cycle of abuse.

 

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19 Comments

Posted by on November 13, 2011 in Family, Relationships & Personal Growth

 

Tags: , , , ,

19 responses to “Penn State: It’s all about football

  1. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    Joe Pa never covered anything up, he didn’t do anything wrong.

     
    • Skyler J. Collins

      November 13, 2011 at 4:15 pm

      Matt, according to this, he had knowledge. What would you do with that kind of knowledge? What should you do with that kind of knowledge?

       
      • Matt Goodman

        November 13, 2011 at 4:27 pm

        This is the current law and the law that was in place at the time of the incident

        (c) Staff members of institutions, etc.–Whenever a person
        is required to report under subsection (b) in the capacity as a
        member of the staff of a medical or other public or private
        institution, school, facility or agency, that person shall
        immediately notify the person in charge of the institution,
        school, facility or agency or the designated agent of the person
        in charge. Upon notification, the person in charge or the
        designated agent, if any, shall assume the responsibility and
        have the legal obligation to report or cause a report to be made
        in accordance with section 6313. This chapter does not require
        more than one report from any such institution, school, facility
        or agency.

        Joe Pa did what he was required to do by law

        Look I don’t want people thinking that I feel that nothing bad happened that day and the days before that, it is a horrible tragedy, i feel bad for the victims and i feel the people that did wrong by them should be punished, but we can’t go and punish every single person on campus that day,

         
      • Matt Goodman

        November 13, 2011 at 4:31 pm

        Also i can’t compare my self with Joe Pa nor am i going to, I am in a completely different profession under a complete different law in a complete different state with its own set of laws

         
      • Skyler J. Collins

        November 13, 2011 at 4:34 pm

        It’s a no brainer, really. You don’t pass it up the chain of command. You call the authorities. And even if all you do is pass it up, you follow up. You don’t continue coaching and noticing to the guy on campus like nothing’s happened. Duh.

         
  2. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 2:38 pm

    I’m not saying what happened wasn’t tragic for the victims but we can’t go around blaming everyone because of it

     
  3. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 4:42 pm

    Again Skyler it was hear say to Joe Pa, he did what was required to do by law, could he gone the extra mile and followed up? Yes. But is it against the law that he didn’t? No, What if it was a false report given to Joe by that student? Do you expect that coach to be fired on the spot, because of rumor that had not yet been investigated? Again Joe Pa did what was required to do by law you can’t punish a person for following the law

     
    • Skyler J. Collins

      November 13, 2011 at 8:25 pm

      You can’t punish a person by law, sure, but you absolutely can “punish” them through civil means, such as firing him, which they did, and socially ostracizing him. Just because the law can’t touch him, doesn’t mean society can’t in non-violent ways.

       
      • Matt Goodman

        November 13, 2011 at 8:36 pm

        So you want to basically discriminate against him because in your mind he did something wrong but can’t be punished by law, Now how is that any better?

         
      • Skyler J. Collins

        November 13, 2011 at 8:57 pm

        Same goes for law enforcement officers who do horrible rights violating things and aren’t punished by the law. They should be punished with what little power society has left.

         
  4. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 9:01 pm

    if these law enforcement officers you speak of are actually violating people’s rights then that is punishable by the law and yes that should be enforced if what you say is true

     
  5. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    If your argument is going to just be a random website whose founder has had run-ins with law enforcement because he did not follow the law and got his feeling hurts because of it and has a history of problems with authority figures, then i believe you need do your homework, People forget about all the good police do, you forget about the officer shot and killed when he attempted to stop a robbery, you forget that they put their lives on the line to protect you, and when was the last time you said “thank you” to them, instead you criticize every little move they make, stop and think what your world would be like with out them, http://www.officer.com

     
    • Skyler J. Collins

      November 13, 2011 at 9:39 pm

      You obviously missed my point. I never said “all cops are bad!”. To the contrary, I was demonstrating that yes, cops, many, not all, obviously, do bad things, illegal things, and the law doesn’t touch them. When the law fails, it’s the responsibility of society to seek justice. The police have a monopoly on law enforcement, unfortunately, so all society has to resort to is civil, non-violent punishments, such as the firing of this coach, or in socially ostracizing deviant behavior, yes, even by law enforcement.

       
  6. Matt Goodman

    November 13, 2011 at 9:59 pm

    Obviously police have a monopoly on law enforcement, that is the definition of police, you can’t enforce laws with out police, you tell me how we can un-monoployize law enforcement. the law dose touch them, people just refuse to see that because of people like the founder of your website who have problems being told what to do. Yes there are some law enforcement officials that don’t always follow the law are they go through the same process that all other criminals go though, you have to also think of all the false reports against these police officers from people like your website founder, if every single little report from every single person against the officers went through the entire court process we would not have any police on the streets, there are two sides to every story and people tend to only listen to the loudest one which is almost always against the officers. from what you have said i understand it as you want people to police themselves when they feel that someone should be punished and wasn’t, because they have not broken a law, or because of a false report given by a person that got they’re feelings hurt.

     
    • Anonymous

      November 14, 2011 at 7:39 am

      It’s not about hurt feelings, it’s about real crimes by law enforcement. They get away with tyranny all the time. When they arrest someone for legally recording them, they aren’t charged with kidnapping. They should be. Or when they raid the wrong house, very common, and kill someone’s dog and terrorize an innocent family, they aren’t charged with breaking and entering and the destruction of property. They should be. They aren’t punished at all. It’s disgusting and a giant injustice. And it happens all the time. Same with prosecutorial misconduct. That’s what monopolized services get you. And yes, I’m absolutely in favor of competition in security and dispute adjudication. Read Murray Rothbard and Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Start here: http://mises.org/journals/jls/9_1/9_1_2.pdf

       
    • Anonymous

      November 14, 2011 at 7:39 am

      It’s not about hurt feelings, it’s about real crimes by law enforcement. They get away with tyranny all the time. When they arrest someone for legally recording them, they aren’t charged with kidnapping. They should be. Or when they raid the wrong house, very common, and kill someone’s dog and terrorize an innocent family, they aren’t charged with breaking and entering and the destruction of property. They should be. They aren’t punished at all. It’s disgusting and a giant injustice. And it happens all the time. Same with prosecutorial misconduct. That’s what monopolized services get you. And yes, I’m absolutely in favor of competition in security and dispute adjudication. Read Murray Rothbard and Hans-Hermann Hoppe. Start here: http://mises.org/journals/jls/9_1/9_1_2.pdf

       
  7. Skyler J. Collins

    November 14, 2011 at 7:40 am

    Last comment was by my.

     

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